Born here?

by TBG

Born here?
Civic citizenship is a monstrous revolutionary idea which will strip an ethnic and recogniseable national identity out of a nation.

 

In a recent Scottish court case for a politically correct ‘offence’ an ethnic Briton defendant was deliberately asked “where were you born?”, as the accuser was an alien. The defendant answered that he had been born abroad but was 100% British and that Britain was ‘home’. His family had lived in the UK continuously for 1000 years. The lawyer’s insinuation was that the other person, who had been in England a mere decade, was as much entitled to be called “British” as he was.

This raises the issue of civic citizenship, a concept of the French Revolution, and used by the new USA also, which was adopted by the British Labour Party into UK law after World War II, incorporating the idea that wherever you are born becomes your instant nationality; or that citizenship can be ‘acquired’ without any attachment whatsoever to the host nation. This Far-Left concept eradicates the traditional notion that your nation and homeland is primarily based upon race and its culture (remembering always that culture comes from race, not vice-versa).

Since at least Bismarck’s period in office, German ‘citizenship’ was automatic, irrespective of place of birth, as long as you could provide proof that you were an ethnic German. You would always have a place in the homeland. In 1913 these laws were amended (but were drastically changed to become politically correct in 1999). In China, to this day, a foreigner, whether born there or not, cannot acquire Chinese citizenship. A new birth must be registered, of course, but primarily with the Consul or Embassy of the parents. No-one in their right mind would suggest that a European child born in, say, Nigeria, could be classified as Nigerian. He is rightly, an alien.  The liberal-left have demonstrated they believe this by their never-ending attacks upon Europeans born and even brought up and educated in Africa, notably Rhodesia and South Africa.

Many Britons for centuries have travelled the world being born, married and buried in countless different countries. Some travelled for pleasure, some for business, others in the armed forces. Some may even settle for a time abroad. But does that alter their ethnicity and alienate them from their natural homeland to the point of ridicule by those at home?

The Scots and Irish are an interesting case point. They constantly speak of their diaspora and countless books have been published by authors and learned bodies on this subject. In the USA we hear of Irish-Americans rather than just Americans, and the New York and Boston St. Patrick’s Day parades are almost national institutions.

Thomas Fischer’s famous books The Scots in Germany and The Scots in East Prussia come to mind, the Scottish History Society published a book on Scots in Poland, and Gordon Donaldson published his book The Scots Overseas in 1966. In North America, Australia and New Zealand we find the Scottish churches thriving, and the continuance of Scottish dress (the kilt), customs (such as Burns night and Highland Games), and various mythologies fiercely maintained by those who continue to regard themselves as Scots. People flock to family history societies for genealogical proof of their ethnicity, of which they are naturally proud.

In the case of Scotland I have looked at two examples of established landed families. The current Laird of one, who lives in and maintains his ancestral castle and estate, was indeed born in the UK, but his father was born and educated in Canada where his parents married and his mother was born and died. The laird’s paternal grandfather, however, was born in Mysore, India (as were all his brothers), and he was buried in Canada.

The next family are Scottish baronets. The current baronet was born in Cyprus and currently lives in Sydney, Australia. His father was born in Lucknow, India. His father in turn was born in Sultanpur, and married in Lucknow, his wife being born in Cawnpore, Bengal. His parents were married in Mussoorie, Bengal, India.

These two families nevertheless returned home and now reside here. No-one in their right mind would consider them Indians or Canadians etc.

Today we see a situation where those with 100% British ancestry who arrive back in the ‘old country’ are treated as second class and with derision. A good example was some 30 years ago when a brilliant young violinist with the Birmingham Symphony Orchestra was refused an extension to her work permit and threatened with deportation to Australia. At the same time the UK is admitting millions of total aliens.

Civic citizenship is a monstrous revolutionary idea which will strip an ethnic and recogniseable national identity out of a nation. It is supported by the Liberal-Left because they are both internationalists, believe in open borders, and are against nation-states and a clear national identity.

We all have a duty to oppose civic citizenship and call for a new Nationality Act, retrospective to at least 30 years, as a matter of extreme urgency.
                                                      

Gregory Lauder-Frost