Traditional Britain Seminars 2014: John Morgan on Schools of Thought in the European 'Alternative Right'

by The Editor

Julius Evola coined the term “men among the ruins” to designate those few individuals who had the strength to stand by their convictions despite the near-total devastation and desecration of their ideals. This forced a complete re-evaluation of what the “true Right” meant and a return to first principles, and, fortunately, produced a number of interesting new strands of political, social, religious and cultural thought. These strands have tended to synthesize the traditional with the innovative, and even sometimes venture into territory that is typically considered “Leftist” or even anarchistic. The pertinent question today is, what are the most effective ideas and techniques that can be used to combat liberalism today?

On the 8th March the Traditional Britain Group will be hosting a half day event, titled 'Traditional Britain Seminars 2014' at a prestigious club in central London from 1pm until 6pm, followed by an evening social until late.

For more details, see here.

Schools of Thought in the European ‘Alternative Right’

After the Second World War, the Continental Right, and those who stood by the various aspects of the European tradition more generally, found themselves in a catastrophic situation on an unprecedented scale. Effectively suppressed and driven underground by the Communists in the East, and thoroughly discredited due to their association with the legacy of fascism in the West, liberalism’s triumph seemed absolute.

What has come to pass for the “Right” in Europe since then has been nothing more than another strand of liberalism, and hence why some have taken to calling those who hearken back to this earlier form by such names as the “alternative Right” or the “true Right.” Julius Evola coined the term “men among the ruins” to designate those few individuals who had the strength to stand by their convictions despite the near-total devastation and desecration of their ideals. This forced a complete re-evaluation of what the “true Right” meant and a return to first principles, and, fortunately, produced a number of interesting new strands of political, social, religious and cultural thought. These strands have tended to synthesize the traditional with the innovative, and even sometimes venture into territory that is typically considered “Leftist” or even anarchistic.

Among the most notable efforts have been Alain de Benoist’s GRECE in France (or what came to be called the “French New Right”) and its offshoots; the work of Prof. Alexander Dugin in Russia, which began in the political undergrowth during the waning years of the Soviet Union; the various forms of “traditionalism” which have emerged in the wake of the thought of René Guénon, Evola and Frithjof Schuon; and in the arts by such maverick filmmakers as Hans-Jürgen Syberberg and Andrei Tarkovsky. We shall briefly explore the nature and history of these and other groups, figures and ideas and discuss their continuing relevance. I also plan to discuss how my own endeavor, Arktos Media, came to be and how we are attempting to facilitate the growth of these and similar ideas today. We should also discuss the question of, what are the most effective ideas and techniques that can be used to combat liberalism today?

John Morgan

John Morgan is Editor-in-Chief of Arktos Media, officially launched to the public in May 2010 and, since that time, it has has published more than 50 titles in four languages and circulated them globally. Arktos has established itself as the principal publisher in English of the writings of the European “New Right” school of political thought.

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